About Lyme disease

What exactly is Lyme disease?

(A few of my own words):
6ccf0-6x6_itdoesnthavemeLyme disease, the bacteria it is, and the effects it has, is real, is scary, and is far more widespread than anyone would want to believe. It is difficult and therefore expensive to deal with, and therefore medical insurance and research and nation-wide practices to treat it are not keeping up with the disease.
It has been around for a very long time, and is an expression of the fallen state of our world. The bacteria is resilient, sneaky, and smart, creating its own cysts and morphing when attacked, killing off antibodies that would kill it. It is spreading. As natural habitats shrink and get sick due to human consumption, the affected organisms have no choice but to affect the human population. No one is immune. But one day, it too will be swallowed up in victory.
Words from others dealing with it: excellent video on YouTube
Words from some experts:

(From Douglas Fearn of PA, as found on personalconsult.com): Lyme disease is a bacterial infection, most commonly contracted from a tick bite, that may initially cause a flu-like sickness. Untreated, or inadequately treated, it may cause long-term, persistent illness that can affect many systems of the body. Other tick-borne diseases are often contracted at the same time.

(From Whole Health Chicago):
Lyme disease is an infection with the bacterium Bb (Borrelia Burgdorferi), but there are five subspecies and more than 100 different Bb strains in the US (300 strains worldwide) that are equally capable of causing infection. This diversity likely contributes to its ability to outfox both the immune system and antibiotic treatment, leading to chronic infection.

Lyme’s reputation as a great imitator means it affects individuals differently. Just about everyone knows Lyme is transmitted by an innocuous-looking, tiny tick. What you may not know is that most sufferers never even remember being bitten by a tick. It’s hard to watch for and catch an infection early when you have few to no warning signs you’re infected.

Here are two ways the infection expresses itself:
First-stage (acute) infection can cause flulike symptoms, joint pain, fatigue, and possibly a rash—all easy to mistake as a bad cold. Furthermore, not everyone experiences these symptoms. Bb also can cause (but doesn’t always) a variety of rashes, one classic example being erythema migrans, which looks like a red target. Far more common, however, are rashes that don’t look exactly like a target. The Lyme rash is short-lived, going away quietly on its own. Little wonder fewer than half of people diagnosed with Lyme disease even notice a rash.

Untreated Lyme infection smolders under the radar, adapting to the tissues where it lives, protecting itself with those slimy biofilms and cysts. Importantly, Lyme also suppresses the immune system so it’s difficult for your body to fight back. For this reason lab tests are often negative on even the sickest Lyme patients, because their suppressed immune systems can’t mount a response that would show on a test. An untreated Lyme infection or infections (remember, there are more than 100 different Borrelia strains) leads to chronic disease in 34% to 62% of patients. Significantly, symptoms including anxiety, severe fatigue, joint pain, and headaches often mimic symptoms of other chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndromes, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), and mood disorders like anxiety and depression.

(From ILADS.org):

FASTEST GROWING
ACCORDING TO THE CDC, LYME DISEASE IS THE FASTEST GROWING VECTOR-BORNE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE UNITED STATES.

25x
 THE NUMBER OF CASES REPORTED ANNUALLY HAS INCREASED NEARLY 25-FOLD SINCE NATIONAL SURVEILLANCE BEGAN IN 1982.
300
THERE ARE 5 SUBSPECIES OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, OVER 100 STRAINS IN THE US, AND 300 STRAINS WORLDWIDE
This diversity is thought to contribute to its ability to evade the immune system and antibiotic therapy, leading to chronic infection

300,000
CDC reports: Lyme disease infects 300,000 people a year. 10 times more Americans than previously reported.
This new preliminary estimate confirms that Lyme disease is a tremendous public health problem in the United States,” says Dr. Paul Mead, chief of epidemiology and surveillance for CDC’s Lyme disease program.
NEW LYME DISEASE CASES IN US
CASES PER MONTH
25,000
CDC ESTIMATE
CASES PER WEEK
5,770
CDC ESTIMATE

CASES PER DAY
822
CDC ESTIMATE
CASES PER HOUR
34
CDC ESTIMATE

NO ACCURATE TESTS
THERE ARE NO TESTS AVAILABLE TO PROVE THAT THE ORGANISM IS ERADICATED OR THAT THE PATIENT IS CURED.

50%
FEWER THAN 50% OF PATIENTS WITH LYME DISEASE RECALL A TICK BITE.
50%
FEWER THAN 50% OF PATIENTS WITH LYME DISEASE RECALL ANY RASH.

35%
THE ELISA SCREENING TEST IS UNRELIABLE.
The common Elisa test you receive at your doctor’s office misses 35% of culture proven Lyme disease. Some studies indicate up to 50% of the patients tested for Lyme disease receive false negative results.
50%
UP TO FIFTY PERCENT OF TICKS IN LYME-ENDEMIC AREAS ARE INFECTED.
The onset of Lyme disease symptoms can be easily mistaken for other illnesses. Once symptoms are more evident the disease may have already entered the central nervous system, and could be hard to cure.

40%
40% OF LYME PATIENTS END UP WITH LONG TERM HEALTH PROBLEMS.
The average patient sees 5 doctors over nearly 2 years before being diagnosed.
40%
SHORT TREATMENT COURSES HAVE RESULTED IN UPWARDS OF A 40% RELAPSE RATE, ESPECIALLY IF TREATMENT IS DELAYED.
There has never been a study demonstrating that 30 days of antibiotic treatment cures chronic Lyme disease. However there is much documentation demonstrating that short courses of antibiotic treatment fail to eradicate the Lyme spirochete.
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